Media and News

Cornell University campaign in the news: bottledwater.net – November 2010

Student Assembly Resolution 35 Passed in support of Take Back the Tap at Cornell November 2010

Cornell Daily Sun article.

The Student Assembly passed a resolution Thursday to phase out bottled water sales on campus. Resolution 35 was presented by Take Back the Tap — a campus group devoted to the issue — with support from other student organizations and administrators such as Kyu Whang and Kent Hubbell ’67.

Green Groupies Interview- October 2010

Season 2, Episode 2: Take Back the Tap. This week we interview Sherry Martin ’11 from the group Take Back the Tap, and then dive further into the impending water crisis. This is followed with some positive environmental news and interspersed with groovy music!

Green Groupies Interview- April 2010

Radio interview with Green Groupies.
Kristen Loria ’11 and Erin Johnson ’10 talk about their work with Take Back the Tap on Slope Media’s Green Groupies radio show. Listen for some great discussion about bottled water along with your weekly dose of environmental news and music.

Earth Day 2010- Take Back the Tap

Video with Slope Media. Slope Media’s Ariella Weintraub interviews Erin Johnson ’10 at the Earth Day Celebration on Ho Plaza and tests out the Tap Water Challenge.

Earth Day 2010- Cornell Chronicle article

Cornell Chronicle article.
Take Back the Tap joins over 25 other student groups on campus for Earth Day 2010!

Campus Sustainability Highlights- April 2010

Cornell Daily Sun article.
The Sun highlights major campus sustainability projects, including Take Back the Tap.

Cornell Looks Ahead to Greener Future- February 2010

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Student organizations, Cornell’s Dept. of Energy and Sustainability, and Cornell’s Center for a Sustainable Future work towards reaching climate neutrality with the Climate Action Plan. Take Back the Tap works to reduce bottled water consumption and to gain university support in eliminating bottled water on campus.

FrackNO! Rally- December 2009

Cornell Chronicle article.
At the FrackNO! Rally, Take Back the Tap shows solidarity with KyotoNOW and Shaleshock to raise awareness about the risks of hydrofracking (hydraulic fracturing) in the Marcellus Shale region, including potential groundwater contamination and the impact upon drinking water quality.

Water is Life- FrackNO! Rally- December 2009

Cornell Daily Sun article.
K.C. Alvey ’12, a member of Take Back the Tap, a campaign for the reduction of bottled water use, highlights the high quality of Ithaca’s tap water and explains the risks of hydrofracking at FrackNO! Rally. Marcellus Shale drilling could jeopardize the purity of these prized reserves.

Sustainability Leadership Summit- November 2009

Cornell Chronicle article.
Take Back the Tap participates in the Sustainability Leadership Summit and brainstorms ways to reduce Cornell’s environmental impact, along with other student organizations.

Bottled Water Structure Raises Awareness- Earth Day 2009

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Take Back the Tap creates a structure on Earth Day 2009 to raise awareness about the waste that bottled water creates.

Earth Day 2009- Take Back the Tap

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Take Back the Tap joins other student sustainability organizations on Earth Day 2009 in order to inform students about the environmental, social, and economic implications of bottled water. In particular, Sherry Martin ’11 points out that Aquafina, which is sold in Cornell Dining locations, is simply tap water that has been bottled.

Cornell Lacks Plan to Ban Bottled Water- February 2009

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Other universities across the U.S., such as Washington University, have banned the sale of bottled water because of its environmental impact. However, Cornell University has no plan to do so, as a result of its contract with PepsiCo., which supplies Aquafina.

Water Prudence- February 2009

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Opinion writer from the Daily Sun describes that with the collaborative effort of both students and the University, we can take strong strides forward in making Cornell more sustainable and promoting responsible and environmentally friendly means of water consumption.

Prof. Challenges Univ. to Limit Bottled Water Consumption- October 2008

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Prof. James Quest ’56 creates the H2O Competition for Hotel Students to find innovative alternatives to bottled water, in order to promote more socially responsible business practices.

Earth Day 2008- Tap Water Challenge

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Students from the Sustainability Hub hold a taste test of tap water versus plastic bottled water at Earth Day 2008. According to Chelsea Clarke ’10, member of the Sustainability Hub, the project aims to raise awareness about the harmful aspects of drinking bottled water. Erin Johnson ’10 explains that, “tap water has stricter regulations” than bottled water, so it is just as healthy to drink as bottled water.

Bottled Water and Slope Day- May 2008

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Each year, over 30,000 bottles of water are handed out on Slope Day, and many of these bottles end up clogging landfills instead of being recycled, according to the Cornell Campus Life purchasing department. Christina Copeland ’11, member of the Sustainability Hub, has been working to reduce the use of bottled water on campus, particularly on Slope Day because plastic bottles can only be used once.

Student Raise Awareness of About Bottled Water- October 2007

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Christina Copeland ’11, through her Bottled Water Campaign, is attempting to show the Cornell community that drinking bottled water is not only bad for the environment, but also that the water is no different than tap water.

Do Not Drink the Water- October 2007

Cornell Daily Sun article.
Opinion writer from the Daily Sun explains that it’s incumbent upon the University to institute real, tangible change regarding bottled water and that the University should support student efforts. For example, through her Bottled Water Campaign, students like Christina Copeland ’11 are already leading grassroots efforts to reduce consumption on campus and increase public awareness.